Jack Li On "The New Foodservice Landscape"

Posted by IFMA March 12, 2014

Tagged in Foodservice Industry Research Foodservice Innovation Industry Research Presidents Conference

Being a part of the foodservice industry means having a constant hunger for valuable insights into consumer behavior. Any information that gives us deeper understanding of what motivates our targets in their decision-making process is coveted and sought after. That's why we're so pleased to bring forth this executive summary from Jack Li's presentation at Presidents Conference 2013. As the managing director of Datassential, Jack knows a few things about what makes consumers tick. We're fortunate to count him as a true IF Maker.

 

 

Key takeaways from the summary:

  • Understanding occasions is key
  • Know your "eater types"
  • Creating a new view of the foodservice industry

Login to view "The New Foodservice Landscape." This summary and all others in the series are exclusively available to IFMA members. Contact ifma@ifmaworld.com to discover more benefits of being an IFMA member.


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Other Executive Summaries from Presidents Conference 2013:

Bottom Line Branding™: Creating Demand and Driving Profitable Sales in Today's Changing World

Operator/Manufacturer Collaboration Model & FSNavigator 

Industry-Wide Initiatives Changing The Face Of Foodservice

Do You Have WIIFW Partnerships With Your Suppliers?

Noble Logo 2013

 About the Presidents Conference Executive Summary Sponsor

Noble is a full-service food marketing agency that has provided thought leadership in the foodservice industry for five decades by understanding what makes people tick, grabbing their attention, piquing their appetites, and tugging at their heart strings-at home and away-with insight driven ideas that connect. For more information, visit Noble's website.

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